<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1604645686483532&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
A couple weeks ago, we put out a challenge. The generosity that flowed out of it was more than we could've ever imagined.

How we challenged people to 'give what you can, take what you need'

"We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give." (CLICK TO TWEET)

CHALLENGE

  1. Withdraw $40 in one dollar bills from the bank.
  2. Pin them to a bulletin board in a crowded public space.
  3. Sit back and see what happens.

What if we gave what we could and took what we needed?

In June, Tyler Bridges, a friend of ours in LA, stepped up and took on the challenge when he pinned $40 one dollar bills to a bulletin board outside of Union Rescue Mission

Hastily drawn on the top of a board, tacked with singles, was an invitation: “Give what you can. Take what you need.”

Over the course of a few hours, groups of spectators gathered around, asking questions, taking photos, and ultimately engaging with a simple idea to “unite strangers in generosity.” 

Through this experience, everyone could participate in something bigger than themselves. The idea and execution were simple enough, but the results were simply magnificent. Take a look: 

1. Generosity impacts

Generosity impacts those in need, but it also changes the lives of those those who give. Pinning a dollar to a board is a basic act, but the act inspires more.

Experiencing generosity shifts our focus from ourselves to others. When that happens, it's no longer about a single dollar on a single day. Lives are changed. 

2. Generosity inspires

Often, we focus only on the end goal of generosity. We’re mesmerized by the statistics: how much was given, who will receive it, what was done.

But it’s easy to lose ourselves in the numbers and forget about the act of giving itself. Whether it’s pinning a $1 bill to a board in a public place or paying for someone’s education, it's not just about the end result--the conscious decision to be generous means something too. 

If you really want to lead people towards generosity, help them experience generosity, no statistics required. 

3. Generosity fosters relationships

There are two sides to generosity: a giver and a recipient. Acting to address others' needs builds an irreplicable bond, one that isn't based on any debt or any justification other than grace and peace. 

Generosity reminds people to value other lives enough to take time and extend a hand. It opens the door to understanding and levels social differences.

Above all else, as image bearers, being generous honors God, uniting us with a Creator who gives beyond measure. 


At Kindrid, we tend to focus a lot on our technology and the best ways to use it.

But we know that technology alone won’t foster a generous church. It’s a great supporting tool but not a complete solution. No amount of technology and education could match the power of witnessing an individual be generous or being generous yourself.

That’s because true generosity can’t be taught; it must be experienced. 

Whether with a dollar bill, a coffee, a conversation, funding someone's education, contracting a building, or offering a prayer, the possibilities are endless. Use #unleashgenerosity to show us how you're experiencing generosity. 

Join leaders around the country who are already subscribed to our mailing list by clicking the button below!

SUBSCRIBE

Subscribe for weekly tips to Unleash Generosity.

Give it a shot! Fresh content weekly, subscribe with a click.

Author
Kindrid
Kindrid
#UnleashGenerosity
We unleash generosity by empowering churches with inspirational, actionable content and Give.Church—a text, in-app, and online giving solution designed to engage new givers.